When good people get in trouble: Missouri (816) 875-0470 Kansas (913) 624-9646

Drivers are arrested on DUI charges every day. Police rely on Breathalyzer tests to determine the driver’s BAC. If the driver’s BAC tests above the legal limit, they are going to jail.

A number of apps are available that purport to provide a BAC test comparable to that performed by police and designed to help people avoid a DUI. However, it’s doubtful that these handheld BAC detectors can actually prevent a DUI.

Apps with a Breathalyzer Attachment

Many of these DUI preventing apps come with an attachment that connects to a smartphone. The driver blows into the attachment and receives an estimated BAC. If it’s over the legal limit, then the driver shouldn’t get behind the wheel. However, it doesn’t follow that a person who tests below the limit is capable of driving or that their BAC is genuinely legal.

Tests that compared the results of the BAC apps with an actual police Breathalyzer found wide discrepancies. In many cases the tester scored well below the legal limit on their phone, yet showed results at twice the legal limit when the police conducted their own test. Since it is the results that the police get that will ultimately lead to a DUI arrest, it’s probably not a good idea to rely on these apps to prevent a DUI.

Some Apps Make More Sense

The Maryland Highway Safety Office developed an app that doesn’t include a breathalyzer attachment, but does allow people to track their consumption and test their reaction times. The app also makes it easy to contact a taxi company or sober driver to get a lift. While it may not be as fancy as other apps, this app and others like it stand a reasonable chance of being a useful tool for helping people avoid a DUI.

If you do end up with a DUI even with an app, Daniel C. Miller can help. Call today at (816) 875-0470 for your free consultation!

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