When good people get in trouble: Missouri (816) 875-0470 Kansas (913) 624-9646

Many states have laws concerning open containers of alcohol and spirits in vehicles. These laws are called “open container laws.” Open container laws vary from state to state, so it’s important to keep up on the latest driving laws. When traveling across state boundaries, be aware of each state’s unique set of driving laws, open container laws included. These laws can be a bit tricky. So, to make things easier, Daniel C. Miller Attorney has created an overview of the Missouri open container laws.

Missouri Open Container Laws

In Missouri, a driver cannot consume any alcoholic beverages while operating a motor vehicle. The state does not have a general open container law for cars, though, something that it shares with a few other states. So, what exactly does this open container law mean? Any non-driving vehicle passenger is allowed to have an open container and drink from the container while the car is moving. Interestingly, 31 smaller municipalities like Independence, Missouri, have local open container laws. As a rule of thumb, a passenger in the state of Missouri can legally drink in a moving car. Passengers should close the container while passing through cities that have conflicting open container laws, though.

Since Missouri doesn’t have a statewide open container law, the state is required to give some of their federal highway funds to alcohol programs every year. Since 1999, there have been several bills introduced on a state level that would have been the basis for an open container prohibition across the entire state of Missouri. Despite various attempts, state efforts haven’t been welcomed with support, so there is yet to be a statewide open container law in place.

As of this point in time, Missouri allows open containers in vehicles and many other states do not. Let these different laws be a reminder to drivers that laws can drastically change in nearby states. If you want to stay out of trouble on the road, stay up-to-date on the latest state driving laws. Need legal aid? Call Daniel C. Miller Attorney at (816) 875-0470 today.